ESPN college basketball analyst Jay Bilas doesn't buy the NCAA's latest move to change its rules so college athletes can profit off their name, image and likeness, mostly because college sports' governing body was taking a different stance two months ago

A unanimous decision Tuesday by the NCAA will allow college athletes to profit from the use of their name, image, and likeness, a new step forward in a debate that has raged in the world of college sports for years. 

State Representative Billy Mitchell (D-Stone Mountain) announced that he will introduce legislation during the 2020 legislative session to allow college athletes to be compensated for the use of their name, likeness and image. 

On Monday, the NFL Players Association (NFLPA) and the National College Players Association (NCPA) announced that they will examine different ways to help college athletes receive payment for the name, image and likeness.

A unanimous decision Tuesday by the NCAA will allow college athletes to profit from the use of their name, image, and likeness, a new step forward in a debate that has raged in the world of college sports for years. 

Paleja recently bought into a new venture, and it’s unlike anything he has touched: a college basketball league that would challenge the NCAA by offering salaries ranging from $50,000 to $150,000.

Following California's lead, Florida lawmakers are tackling NCAA rules that prohibit college athletes from reaping financial benefits from their prowess in the arena of big-money sports.

The subject, of course, is nuanced and Blake James, the Miami Hurricanes’ athletic director, gave a nuanced response on the topic Tuesday, acknowledging there are some circumstances in which players should be able to profit off their likeness.

Hawkeye men's basketball player, Jordan Bohannon, has taken to twitter to show his support of California's Fair Pay to Play Act. Now Representative from Mount Pleasant, Joe Mitchell and Representative from Waterloo, Ras Smith are talking about introducing this act to Iowa legislation.

Vikings defensive lineman Stephen Weatherly called that another step in the right direction for athletes who have helped make college football a billion-dollar industry. 

If anyone can understand what’s wrong with college sports—and why Congress should step in and help—it’s a former college athlete who’s now serving in the U.S. Senate. 

Todd Gurley wasn’t exactly subtle with his thoughts Thursday in the ongoing conversation about amateurism and athlete compensation. 

Democratic Presidential candidate, Cory Booker, will unveil a plan Thursday aimed at tackling the “exploitation” of college and professional athletes, including a proposal for national adaptation of California law allowing college athletes to profit from sponsorships and other opportunities related to their personal brand. 

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